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· Freud (1994)

The first time I ever heard of Freud I was a little boy.

They were interviewing Dalí on television. He was describing how he had met Freud, whom he revered, at his home in London. Dalí kept trying to get his attention, and Freud ignored him completely. Freud later remarked that Dalí seemed to him to be a typical example of a Spaniard, a true fanatic.

Some time afterwards, when I was already a teenager, I read several of his books and was very impressed by them, particularly by one, Totem and Taboo. In my opinion, this book has become outdated in many respects, but it also contains fascinating concepts that I have used in my work, and it has sometimes provided me with a point of departure for certain works related to the family. I was also impressed by his writings on infantile sexuality. I can only imagine how that must have been received by the society of the time. I do not share many of his theories, or the validity of hypnosis; his view of hysteria in general is also more than doubtful. However, we must bear in mind that he is a true pioneer, the man who laid the foundations of psychoanalysis. He is undoubtedly one of the greatest figures in history.


(By the way, in the eternal Freud vs Jung rivalry, I feel closer to Jung).